The contractors have changed their work plan and brought forwards the work to the fish pass, presumably as a result of the continual encouragement from ART and the Board to complete this before the Autumn runs of salmon come in. I spoke with the foreman today and he informed me that tomorrow (weather permitting), the base for the fish pass extension will be poured and the entrance to the fish pass will be modified and the current pipe set up will be removed.

The soon to be modified, upper entrance to the fish pass. By tomorrow evening, the pipe will be removed and the river will flow directly not the fish pass again.

The soon to be modified, upper entrance to the fish pass. By tomorrow evening, the pipe will be removed and the river will flow directly not the fish pass again.

A low coffer dam will be in place at least for the time being but any rise in water level will allow salmon to pass over this easily and unhindered. In just over two weeks time, the side walls will be poured in situ and the fish pass will be completed. Joiners have already constructed the formwork so it’s just a matter of waiting on essential staff returning from annual holidays and the work will continue.

The new timbers fitted to the face of the dam to protect it for the next few hundred years.

The new timbers fitted to the face of the dam to protect it for the next few hundred years. A heavy galvanised crest will be fitted as a cap to the dam.

The protective timbers on the face of the dam have now been installed and the bottom edge is sealed with concrete. A rounded crest is being constructed off site and once fitted will complete the restoration of the upper weir structure. The surface of the weir is currently being coated with lime mortar and despite the vandalism reported last week, the contractors are confident that they can pour up to 50 cubic meters a day. They will have overnight security on the job to prevent a repeat of last weeks mindless damage. The first really large pour will take place this Wednesday, again weather permitting.

Preparing for the next pour of mortar. The stainless steel cables will tied the whole structure together. A timber expansion joint runs between pours, but rebar connects the slabs. Effectively this will become one large smooth slab of concrete.

Preparing for the next pour of mortar. The stainless steel cables will tied the whole structure together. A timber expansion joint runs between pours, but rebar connects the slabs. Effectively this will become one large smooth slab of concrete.

The damaged first test slab was ripped out and repaired. Now hardened, all looks good so the contractors will push ahead with the remainder of this work.

The damaged first test slab was ripped out and repoured. Now hardened, all looks good so the contractors will push ahead with the remainder of this work.

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